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Medical Ethics

Mission Statement
Development of Islamically and ethically Knowledgeable and practicing professionals; with balanced, dynamic and wholesome personality; and sense of social responsibility needed for serving mankind with integrity and steadfastness. (al-An’am 6, 162.)

Aims

  1. To design, develop and implement Academic and Training program for proper development of balanced personality among the students, faculty and support staff.
  2. To sensitize (on the basis of continuous evaluation and review) the administrative & academic staff regarding their ethical and professional responsibilities.
  3. To develop an appropriate Islamic methodology and environment in academic programs, co-curricular activities and field research with highest standards of ethics, morality, and behavior.
  4. To conduct and co-ordinate projects research on ethical issues and total being of humans as Allah's servants of Allah
  5. To create awareness and to educate the community about positive measures to be taken for promotion of physical, mental, social and moral health. (al-Furqan 25:63-77, Luqman 31:13-26, Mulk 67:22, Bani Israeel 17:37, al-Nisa 4:3, al-Ma’eda 5:8, al-An’am 6:152, Ha-Mim as-Sajdah 41:33-34, an-Nahl 16:125, an-Nisa 4:171, al-Maeda 5: 77)

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Islamic Medical Ethics Amidst Developing Biotechnologies

Written by Published in Medical Ethics

Dr. Musa Mohd. Nordin FRCP, FAMM
Consultant Paediatrician & Neonatologist
Damansara Specialist Hospital
MALAYSIA

INTRODUCTION

Heralded by the revelation of the double helical structure of the DNA molecule in 1953, the 21st century is aptly designated the biotechnology century. The 20th century of physics, which saw the transformation of silicon into computing magic, was embraced with enthusiasm by virtually every household. However, unlike her predecessor, the same cannot be said about the advancements in biomedicine.

These revolutionary procedures in biotechnology has probed the outermost boundaries of what is scientifically possible and acceptable. Micro manipulation at the very earliest stages of human development, at the level of the embryo, single cell and genetic structure is undoubtedly a very delicate and sensitive issue with potentially explosive ethical, social, medico-legal and religious ramifications. Hence, the turbulent and not uncommonly hostile controversies that has since evolved.

Some of the issues in biotechnology which are debated contentiously and extensively across all segments of human society, include assisted reproductive technologies, human reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning, embryo research, genetic engineering, euthanasia, organ transplantation, abortion and contraception.

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IBN Sina Memorial Lecture at the 8th International & 39th Annual Convention Of Islamic Medical Association of North America.
Beijing, China
July 25, 2006 - July 28, 2006.

Faroque Ahmed Khan, M.B., M.A.C.P.
Professor of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook
Chairman Board of Trustees, Islamic Center of Long Island, New York
Member Board of Trustees Islamic Medical Association of North America
Member Majlis-Shura of Islamic society of North America.
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

It is, indeed, a great honor for me to give this presentation in the beautiful settings of Beijing, China.

This presentation commemorates the remarkable contributions and achievements of Abu Ali al Husin Ibn Abdullah Ibn Sina. Born in 980 near Bukhara in Uzbekistan, Ibn Sina was the foremost medical scholar, philosopher, and educator in the world at the beginning of the second millenium, a thousand years ago.

I have structured this talk as a conversation with Ibn Sina. Let us assume Ibn Sina has returned from "Barzakh" and is amongst us in Beijing, how might he address the issues regarding the usage, limitations and advantages created by the rapid proliferation of modern technology. I will present some of my own personal observations related to my work as an Intensivist-Pulmonologist and more recently as a ‘spokesperson’ for the Islamic Center of Long Island in New York. The three case studies I will present deal with-1)Intensive care monitoring devices such as Swanz Ganz Catheter-do they really make a difference 2)The case of Terri Schiavo in USA brought into sharp focus the challenge of caring for the hopelessly ill, she ‘died’ from dehydration and starvation-is that permissible? and 3)Grandma Martha’s dilemma-can she carry the fertilized ovum of her daughter Joanne, and Joanne’s husband Robert, Joanne was born without a uterus.

Before we do that, let’s refresh our collective memory regarding Ibn Sina and the times he lived in.....

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FAROQUE A. KHAN, M.B., M.A.C.P. ( e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
Professor of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook

In this article I will briefly outline the following Islamic concepts regarding:

  1. Purpose of Life
  2. The Sanctity of Life
  3. Concept of Death and the Definition of Death
  4. End-of-Life Issues and the Resulting Issues of Advanced Directives, Pain Control and Comfort Care
  5. Some Relevant Case Studies From Author’s Personal Experience Which Highlight the Dilemmas

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Dr. Musa Mohd. Nordin
MBBCh (Wales) FRCP (Edin) FAMM
Consultant Paediatrician & Neonatologist
Damnsara Specialist Hospital
MALAYSIA

INTRODUCTION

Dr. Edwards, an embryologist and Dr. Steptoe, a gynaecologist in the United Kingdom first pioneered the fertility technique called In Vitro Fertilisation Pre-Embryo Transfer ( IVF – ET ). In July 1978, they announced to the world the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown which was a landmark achievement in the science of reproductive medicine (1).

Since then, a myriad of assisted reproductive techniques have surfaced, further refining and superseding earlier technologies. Assisted reproductive technologies ( ART ) refers to all the techniques involved in the management of infertility that require the handling and manipulation of gametes and embryos and treatment modalities to induce ovulation or spermatogenesis. Techniques of invivo assisted reproduction facilitate the fertilization of the gametes within the reproductive tract of the wife. This may be achieved through the procedures of intrauterine insemination (IUI), intratubal insemination (ITI) and gamete intra fallopian transfer ( GIFT) (2). Mating of the gametes ocuur extracorporeally during invitro assisted conception. The modalities to facilitate the fertilization invitro followed by transfer into the reproductive tract include in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer (IVF - ET), pronuclear stage tubal transfer (PROST), zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT) and tubal embryo stage transfer (TEST) (3,4,5). More radical forms of micro-manipulation techniques have been recently developed to assist fertilization of men with severe infertility. These include intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and micro injection of round spermatid nuclei into oocytes (ROSNI) (6,7)

Since the introduction of IVF-ET technology, well over 500,000 babies have been born. The probability of a successful pregnancy is dependant on a variety of factors including the age and the reproductive health of the wife and the husband. Eventhough reported success rates from ART programs can be very confusing and misleading, the probability of a successful outcome has improved from virtually zero to 30-50% at ART centers worldwide.

These new technologies in assisted reproduction has provoked considerable discussions and debates across all segments of human society. These revolutionary procedures in ART has probed the outermost boundaries of what is scientifically possible and acceptable. Micro manipulation at the very earliest stages of human development is a very delicate and sensitive issue with potentially explosive ethical, social, medico-legal and religious ramifications. Hence the turbulent and not uncommonly hostile controversies that has since evolved.

The Islamic Organisation for Medical Sciences (IOMS), first addressed this issue on human reproduction in May 1983. Human reproductive cloning, an offshoot of ART, which is currently attracting a lot of public and media attention was similarly addressed at this 1983 seminar. Since the IOMS seminar, there has been a multitude of medico-Islamic jurisprudence seminars to discuss various contemporary issues related to ART.

This essay attempts to examine the various bioethical facets of ART and present an Islamic perspective of the infertility problem and the bio-religio-ethics of ART.

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The Federation of Islamic Medical Associations (FIMA) is a registered body of 29 IMAs and 17 associate members worldwide, representing about 50,000 Muslim medical and health professionals. The mission of FIMA is to provide a platform for Muslim Physicians world wide in the areas of Medical education and ethics, Student camps and humanitarian and medical relief. It is a not-for-profit, non-political and non-Governmental organization.

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